A Really Quick Derivation of The Cauchy-Riemann Equations

Here is a really quick derivation of the Cauchy-Riemann equations of complex analysis.

Consider a function of a complex variable, z, where z = x + iy, such that:

f(z) = u(z) + i v(z) = u(x+ iy) + i v(x+iy),

where u and v are real-valued functions.

An analytic function is one that is expressible as a power series in z.
That is,

f(z) = \sum_{n=0}^{\infty} a_{n} z^{n}, \quad a_{n} \in \mathbb{C}.

Then,

u(x+iy) + i v(x+iy) = \sum_{n=0}^{\infty} a_{n} (x+iy)^{n}.

We formally differentiate this equation as follows. First, differentiating with respect to x, we obtain

u_{x} + i v_{x} = \sum_{n=1}^{\infty} n a_{n} \left(x+iy\right)^{n-1}.

Differentiating with respect to y, we obtain

u_{y} + i v_{y} = i \sum_{n=1}^{\infty} n a_{n} \left(x + i y\right)^{n-1}.

Multiplying the latter equation by -i and equating to the first result, we obtain

-iu_{y} + v_{y} = \sum_{n=1}^{\infty} na_{n} \left(x+iy\right)^{n-1} = u_{x} + i v_{x}.

Comparing imaginary and real parts of these equations, we obtain

\boxed{u_{x} = v_{y}, \quad u_{y} = -v_{x}},

which are the famous Cauchy-Riemann equations.

 

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Notes on Dynamical Systems

A big part of my research involves dynamical systems theory. A lot of people don’t know what this is, at least, they don’t have a very good idea. It has not helped that the vast majority of Canadian university physics programs have deemphasized classical mechanics and differential equations, but that is an another story! 

Anyways, here are some notes describing what they are and how they work. 

Click the image for the full notes in PDF form.
Click the image above for the rest of the notes.